Three versions of a loving, travelling earworm

I heard the Black Keys version of Have Love, Will Travel for the first time a few days ago.

And I wanted to like it, it I really did. (Because I love the whole Brothers album so very much.) But I just couldn’t forget how fantastic The Basics version is:

[Do ignore the Californication thing. How is that even relevant?]

And then I was worried that I only liked The Basics version because of the joyful, pop-y Beatles-yness (and the perfectly imperfect syncopation).

But then I listened to the original by Richard Berry, which is about as pop-y as it gets:

…and I didn’t like it so much.

Ergo, I think my taste in music (or at least this song) is like my taste in food: really savoury isn’t my thing; completely sweet isn’t (always) my thing; but I truly adore salted caramel. (No really. Give me a bouquet of PayDay bars and I’ll be happy until I die of the diabeetus.)

 

A Beatles song for every financial meltdown

Abbey Road - Amazon.com

You Never Give Me Your Money
(♫…you only give me your funny paper… ♫)

A carefree tune for these parlous economic times *,
from The Beatles, Abbey Road (1969)
……………………………………………………………………………………

* And on that point,
why is the global economy always in a “parlous” state?

Does this word serve no other purpose
than to furnish economists
with their own special euphemism for “scary”?

The short answer?
Yes.

The Maven’s Word of the Day (Random House):
Parlous is actually just a variant form of perilous, and that’s exactly what it means… The existence of the form parlous is the result of a linguistic phenomenon called syncope, in which a word is shortened by the omission of one or more sounds from the middle of it….”

Indeed.
Now play on, my cheerful troubadours….

All the money’s spent, nowhere to go…


First published at tumblr Proof (v.)